Ways to fill up sketchbook pages

Sketchbooks are so difficult to fill up.

For me, on average a sketchbook takes about a year to completely fill up. If I’m stuck in my room drawing all day and all night it takes at least a month.

My most recent sketchbook is almost out of pages and I’ve been getting creative with filling it so I can finish it soon. I want to get a head start with drawing in the sketchbook Arachnid gave me, so I don’t forget about it. *looks guiltily at piles and piles of unfinished sketchbooks*

The one good thing that has come out of speed-completing my sketchbook is that I’m now constantly pulling new ideas from my head. (Even if they don’t work out as expected; those are best drawings)

Here are some things you can fill a sketchbook with:

1. Sketches that take up the whole page with no spaces

I know this takes a long time, but it’s fun to do. You can fill the page up with zentangles, random shapes, puppies, doodles, feet–you name it. Usually, I enjoy making these with the adorable versions of things.

2. Cut doodles out from school notebooks or other things

I do this A LOT. Not as much as I do regular drawings, but still it is very normal for me. Plus, it is a very easy and effective way to fill up those very last pages of a sketchbook if countered with artist’s block.

3. Draw the things you are bad at drawing

Hands. Make a page dedicated to hands. Remember that no one will see your sketchbook except you. (Unless you are like me and have societal pressures for you to expose these private treasures.) Even if someone will see your sketchbook, working on the things you are bad at will improve your drawing skills.

4. Drawings inspired by music

I love to listen to music while drawing. Music takes me to another world. Some people think it’s a distraction, but I believe it’s a tool that helps me think of ideas.

5. Write/Paint

Who says that you have to draw in a sketchbook? Writing is a cool way to put ideas down that you can’t exactly draw yet. Painting and coloring can bring a splash of color into it too.

6. Pen Drawings with sticky notes

You might be asking: why sticky notes? I answer with because they are colorful ways to cover up your mistakes. Don’t use them too much or else the point of creating pen drawings is lost.

7. Create comics or short stories with pictures

I used to do this all the time in my old sketchbook. The whole thing was basically a yellow book with maybe ten pages of normal drawings and the rest being comics about a very gassy ninja.

8. Redraw old drawings

I don’t do this that often, but it’s good to do when you are running out of ideas. Generally, I draw sketches from a long long time ago.

9. Page fillers

When there are blank spaces on a page, I resort to page fillers. Those are basically simple, small and easy to draw doodles. Page fillers for me usually include: Exclamations, cats, roses, triangles, circles, squares, rainbows, koi fish and chibi characters.

10. Scribbles

Try scribbling and making stuff out of the scribbles. It’s simple enough.

How To Create a Difficult Time For A Person Who Wants to Borrow Your Pencil

“Can I borrow your pencil?”

We have all heard the phrase of the lunatic who can’t bother to carry a pencil or even a writing utensil at all times. Stupidity such as that just grinds my gears, because who wouldn’t want to have a multi-faceted-wooden-stick/writing-tool/weapon/stabber? I really can’t name a person who wouldn’t, except the pencil-borrowing shrimps who slug around and aren’t responsible enough to bring a pencil with them. Needless to say, I have been in the trauma-inducing situation of living without a pencil once or twice. But I am talking about that person who asks me ALL THE TIME for a pencil or pen and then ends up breaking it!

Do you want to get revenge on this person?

So first thing is first, find out about your borrower’s pencil habits. If not done so already, identify your pencil borrower. Do not just identify them, stalk them, know everything about them. See their behavior around pencils—what is his/her favorite type of pencil? What are his pencil pet peeves? How many times a day does he sharpen the pencil? How many lead refills does he need to last a year? These are all questions that are important to bring justice to your pencil borrower-breaker.

But the best thing to see, among all these things is this: How does he break the pencil? Keep in mind all his evil plans, from snapping the pencil in half to simply taking out lead from a mechanical pencil. Various writing-utensil-destroying methods may include exploding pens, filling in the top of a marker with another color, and pressing down on chalk so hard it becomes dust. Once you’ve realized what his worst type of pencil is, let’s say a normal wooden pencil, for example, move on to the second step.

From here, start giving out the culprit’s worst type of pencil, and make them almost unusable! Take out erasers, sharpen them until they are the shortest they could be, or do that thing where you take out the lead of a wooden pencil then put it back in so the next person who dares to borrow it has to go through the Seven Gates of Terrible Elementary Wooden Pencildom. So, for you rookies out there, let me introduce you to the seven gates.

Gate One is a dangerous warning of a dangerously stubby pencil— the master’s victim will have to push with all his might to get the last of the lead.

Next up, Gate Two, where he may have to go up to sharpen his pencil in front of the whole class with that old sharpener collecting cobwebs.

Now, he retreats back to his seat, ready for more writing when his lead snaps, which is Gate Three.

He goes back up again, Gate Five, his face reddening with shame.

Finally, when the sharpening is done, he wants to erase something, but he cannot because the lack of the eraser and also realizes that he has skipped the fourth gate, and now considers this the fourth gate.

The sixth gate involves asking desperately for an eraser and the master handsomely declines his request.

Annoyed, the master of the gates gives the young lad a handsome eraser.

The lad begins to erase, but he has scribbled all over his papers! The eraser writes instead of erases and is the greatest weapon in all of The Arts of Pencil Manipulation, also known as the last and seventh gate.

Step Three: repeat steps one and two over and over and over and over again. If your victim doesn’t get a new pencil, go on to the next step.

Now, it is ultimately time for step five, the most frightening and terrifying step of them all. Give them a vicious tool, an item that can never fill things in, virtually uneraseable:

THE CRAYON.

crayon-clip-art-crayon_purple

13 Artist Problems

I’m an artist. I like to draw stuff. Onto the list!

 

1. Mistakes

This drawing is amazing! *Finds stray ink mark and has mini existential crisis*

2. Better People

I will never be a good artist! *sobs in pillow* whyyyyyyyyy?

3. Hands

You put the thumb on the wrong side… *banshee screams*

4. Curious George

CG: Can you draw me? Me: No. I don’t draw ugly things.

5. Bye bye friends…

*Throws away science notes from ten billion years ago*

I will miss you Albino Polish Man with Fluffy Hat, sketch of Naruto, and random bottle of kawaii pepper spice! *cries*

6. Ze Artist Block

Me: *Stares at paper*

…10 hours later…

Paper: This is getting uncomfortable.

Me: *Crumples up paper*

7. Ink/ Water/ Drink/ Noodle Spillage

BLOBFISH!

8. Unsharpened Pencils

*world explodes*

9. What’s That? 

*glares intensely* Can’t you see what is on this paper? 

10. When a person walks in and you haven’t finished drawing the clothes on your character.

Person: …

Me: *examining drawing* Hmmm, how will this cloth curve around her chest?

Person: *walks away*

11. Doodled Up Notes or Reminders

*Takes out notebook and flips to a random page* What is this wonderful adorable smiling cinnamon bun doing here?  *Continues to doodle getting off task*

12. Unfinished Sketchbooks

…They just turn into black holes… *furthers into existential crisis*

13. When the Eraser Starts to Draw Instead of Erasing

*world implodes*

 

That’s what I face on a daily basis. Tiring isn’t it?